Multi-stakeholder workshops on Early Recovery and Resilience aim to support and build Early Recovery capacity at the regional and country level targeting; IASC member organizations, Governments, INGOs, Local NGO’s and other international actors. The Global Cluster for Early Recovery (GCER) will contribute to the development of the course content and training materials for events, specifically acting as expert advisor on materials relating to Early Recovery and Emergency Preparedness and Response.

Photo Credit: UNDP

A la requêt de la Directrice Principale du bureau du PNDU en Haïti, GCER s'est engagé dans un mission de soutien au Relèvement Rapdide dans le context de l'interface entre l'action humanitaire et le développement et le Nouveau Monde de Fonctionnement.

GCER a assuré la facilitation des réunions suivantes : 

  • - Secteur Relèvement Rapide et Moyens de Subsistance : un atelier sur le Relèvement Rapide dans le contexte des liens entre l'action humanitaire et le développement
  • - Bureau du PNUD : Une formation sur le Relèvement Rapide dnas le contexte des liens entre l'action humanitaire et le développement
  • - Gourpe intersectroirl : une réunion sur le Relèvement Rapide dnas le contexte des liens entre l'action humanitaire et le développement

 

Présentations

 

Documents

 

A multi-stakeholder workshop was conducted in Ankara and Gaziantep in the beginning of April 2017. The purpose of the workshops was for 3RP partners to reach a common understanding of the collective and sectoral strategic directions for the 3RP Response in Turkey with a strengthened resilience lens and longer term vision to subsequently inform the mid-term review and later the revision of the 3RP. This was complemented with lessons learned from the Lebanon 3RP process, which is considered an example of success in collaboration between humanitarian and development agencies and coordination with government. 

 

Key Documents

3RP Regional Strategy Overview

 

Since the beginning of the crisis in 2011, Syria has witnessed significant challenges in the humanitarian and security situation across the country, an increase in the targeting of civilian infrastructure, and a marked increase in internal displacement. The conflict has significantly damaged the country’s public and private assets including health, education, energy, water and sanitation, agriculture, transportation, housing and other infrastructure leading to a massive deterioration of Syria’s socio-economic infrastructure. Investments, services, production and manufacturing are among the most affected sectors due, inter alia, to a drastic decrease of electricity supply. Basic infrastructure and public services are being systematically destroyed. Families are struggling to survive in increasingly desperate conditions.

 

Against this background, the ER cluster in Gaziantep cross-border operation aims to contribute to the resilience building of affected local communities, households and individuals by protecting and restoring livelihoods and enabling access to essential services and rehabilitation of socio-economic infrastructures. To this end, the 2017 cluster response focuses on: Improve safe access to basic and social essential services and infrastructure for affected people and institutions. (2) Restore disrupted livelihoods for strengthened social protection and positive coping mechanisms of affected people and vulnerable groups. (3) Promote social cohesion and local participation for more resilient communities     

 

Objectives

The purpose of the workshop was to strengthen capacity and knowledge among Early Recovery cluster partners/members in Gaziantep on the ER approach by providing hands-on exercises, skills and tools to define the ER concept in the cross-border operation as well as to effectively mainstream it across the work of other clusters. With the above in mind, the deliverables of the workshop were to a) set a common understanding of ER in the Gaziantep cross-border operation, including the contextualization of its guiding principles; b) identify joint areas of work for cluster partners under ER HRP strategic objective; c) identify cluster gaps and seek ways to fill them through better inter-cluster coordination on WASH, Health, Food Security and Livelihood, CCCM, Shelter/NFIs; and d) redefine, refocus and reshape the scope of the cluster.

 

Key Documents

Syria Early Recovery Mainstreaming Workshop February 2017 - Gaziantep : Agenda

Presentation - Syria Early Recovery Mainstreaming Workshop Gaziantep

Criteria for integrating ER

 

Other ressources 

Syria Country page

 

Since the beginning of the crisis in 2011, Syria has witnessed significant challenges in the humanitarian and security situation across the country, an increase in the targeting of civilian infrastructure, and a marked increase in internal displacement. The conflict has significantly damaged the country’s public and private assets including health, education, energy, water and sanitation, agriculture, transportation, housing and other infrastructure leading to a massive deterioration of Syria’s socio-economic infrastructure. Investments, services, production and manufacturing are among the most affected sectors due, inter alia, to a drastic decrease of electricity supply. Basic infrastructure and public services are being systematically destroyed. Families are struggling to survive in increasingly desperate conditions.

 

The Early Recovery and Livelihood (ERL) sector aims to contribute to the resilience building of affected local communities, households and individuals by protecting and restoring livelihoods and enabling access to essential services and rehabilitation of socio-economic infrastructures. To this end, the 2016 sector response focuses on: (1) sustained and enhanced service delivery and basic community infrastructure; (2) creation and stabilization of basic livelihoods and social protection for socio-economic recovery; (3) promotion of social cohesion and communities’ engagement to strengthen the resilience of affected people and mitigate the effects of the protracted crisis. 

 

Objectives

The overall objective of the workshop is to build capacity and knowledge among relevant ERL sector partners/members on the early recovery approach by providing hands-on skills and tools to effectively integrate and mainstream early recovery across the work of the sectors in Syria. The primary target group of this workshop will be the ERL sector partners/members operating from inside Syria since 2012. Once the ERL sector/cluster will be established in Gaziantep, an introductory workshop to ER will be planned catering for the needs and priorities of the partners operating through cross-borders mechanisms.

 

Key Documents

Early Recovery Mainstreaming Workshop 23_24 September 2016 - Beirut : Concept Note

Early Recovery Mainstreaming Workshop 23_24 September 2016 - Beirut : Agenda

Humanitarian-Development nexus

A Smarter Humanitarian Response

Integrated Needs and Vulnerability framework (Intro)

Measuring Early Recovery

Definition of ER in the global humanitarian system (ppt)

Criteria for integrating ER

Evolution of ER sector in Syria

 

Other ressources 

Syria Country page 

365 Days of Resilience inside Syria - UNDP Syria Achievements in 2015

 

Background and Objectives

 

Upon invitation from UNDP CO Lebanon, and in the framework of the LCRP 2017-2020 preparation, CRU/GCER was invited to hold a series of workshops focused on the Early Recovery (ER) approach and recovery-based programming, and to present the conclusions and recommendations on integrating ER and stabilization perspectives to high-level representatives from ministries, donors, civil society and key UN agencies engaged in the LCRP.

 

Three workshops spanning one day were held with regional sector leads from the South, the North, and the national level coordinators with the following objectives:

  • a)         Achieve a common understanding on Early Recovery (ER), and how it relates to stabilization within the LCRP framework;
  • b)         Increase the engagement of LCRP partners in incorporating ER in project design/programming leading to a reduction of long-term dependence on humanitarian aid, with a particular emphasis on engagement with local communities and government institutions (and links to AAP).

 

Key Documents

Workshop on Early Recovery & Stabilization (ppt)

Measuring Early Recovery (Prezi)

 

Click here to learn more on Early Recovery in Lebanon

GCER commissioned Groupe URD to develop a method for measuring progress in terms of resilience and early recovery in order to improve the integration and operationalizing of the ER concept in the collective response to humanitarian crises. In the framework of this project entitled “Strengthening multi-stakeholder Early Recovery Capacity”, Groupe URD selected Bangladesh, Chad, Niger and Nepal as relevant contexts for organizing Awareness and Exchange workshops, as well as working seminars aiming at developing an ER evaluation tool.

 

To learn more on this project and on Groupe URD, please click here.

Objectives

  1. Strengthen the conceptual and actionable framework for Early Recovery (ER) in situations of prolonged crises, complex emergencies and transitions contexts, and become familiar with mainstreaming tools in the framework of the humanitarian programming cycle.
  2. Contribute to the debate on the role of ER and the humanitarian community in a transitional context to an eventual post-conflict agreement in Colombia

 

Results Expected

  • • Generate broad knowledge of ER, its guiding principles, mainstreaming elements, and coordinating mechanisms for contextualizing it to the Colombian situation.
  • • Generate awareness of international and domestic experiences that allow enrichment of ER program offerings.
  • • Know different international and domestic ER experiences in transition and post-conflict contexts that contribute strategically to the debate on the role of the humanitarian community in a future post-agreement/post-conflict.
  • • Strengthen the consolidation of an ER NETWORK to ensure mainstreaming of the approach to include focal points in each Local Humanitarian Team and each one of the Clusters.
  • • Draft new TORS for the ER Working Group that allow clarity in the definition, functioning and operability of the working group, both at the national and local levels.
  • • Disseminate to all UNDP areas and partners the offerings related to rapid response and ER.

 

Key Documents

Agenda Early Recovery Workshop

Colombia Humanitarian Architecture and Integration

Early Recovery Workshop

Early Recovery programming

Resiliencia y Restauracion de la Gobernabilidad local

Recuperacion de Medios de Vidas, Reintegracion y Construccion de Paz

 

Click here to learn more on Early Recovery in Colombia.

In 2013 an Early Recovery (ER) Sector was established by the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) in Myanmar with the aim to integrate ER approaches into the humanitarian response and to build a foundation for integrated programs that support longer-term recovery. In November 2014, the HCT recommended that the sector be mainstreamed within the clusters/sectors and adopt a network approach. This shift in coordination arrangement was in line with global practices and suited to the country capacity.

 

In order to support the transition from a sectorial coordination to the network approach, UNDP, in its capacity as Global Cluster Lead on Early Recovery and in coordination with OCHA, requested the support from the Global Cluster on Early Recovery.

 

The mission from the GCER was conducted from March 29th to April 6th and one of its objectives was to support UNDP Myanmar Country Office and the newly established Early Recovery Network establish a common understanding on Early Recovery and setting the agenda for Early Recovery, including the mainstreaming and identifying priorities. The mission included consultations with Heads of key the Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator (RC/HC), heads of key agencies (OCHA, UNHCR, WFP, UNICEF), the coordinator of the International NGO Forum and cluster and Sector Leads to gather expectations and feedback on Early Recovery and the Early Recovery Network. The mission also included a one--‐day workshop to harmonize the understanding among members of the ERN (Cluster and sector leads), the government and civil society, identify gaps and setting the agenda for the ERN for the 2015 humanitarian program cycle. The workshop’s main facilitator was Mr. Charles Von Huff, Inter‐Agency Early Recovery Advisor IASC GCER/UNDP Crisis Interface Team.

 

Key Documents

GCER Mission (Workshop Report) April 2015

GCER Mission to Myanmar ToR

 

Click here to learn more on Early Recovery in Myanmar.

At the request of UNDP Country Office, the UNDP Bureau for Policy and Programme Support (BPPS)/ Livelihoods and Economic Recovery Team and the Crisis Response Unit/Crisis Interface team / Global Cluster for Early Recovery conducted a mission to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) (23-27 March, 2015) to:

  • • Support the further roll out of the UNDP Early Recovery and resilience support Package for DRC, funded by the CPR TTF, the finalization of the respective work plans of the newly deployed UNDP Early Recovery Experts/ Specialist: i) to ensure the integration of early recovery in the humanitarian response; ii) support ER project development and scale-up; iii) to define modalities to strengthen UNDP’s engagement within the humanitarian response and its coordination.
  • • ​Facilitate a high-level multi-stake holder workshop on Early Recovery in DRC:
    • o Explore the most appropriate coordination mechanism(s) to ensure the integration of early recovery in the humanitarian response;
    • o Explore how to ensure coherence between the different pillars (humanitarian, stabilization, and development; and
    • o Explore financing modi operandi to enhance a more fluid transition between humanitarian and development work.

 

Key Documents

Agenda Workshop March 2015

Final Report ER mission DRC March 2015

Recommandations Workshop March 2015

ER Resilience Workshop March 2015

Lien PNUD-Humanitaires 2005 - 2015 DRC March 2015

Presentation GCP Recom Workshop 2015

 

Click here to learn more on Early Recovery in DRC.

Sudan experiences a complex emergency where different parts of the country exist in various transitional phases. Whilst the lingering humanitarian crises bring relief-focused needs that still demand short-term support, the patterns of assistance need to evolve as opportunities permit. Though it is not possible to pursue robust recovery in all contexts in Sudan, the protracted crisis demands a multi-sector integrated early recovery approach which begins early in humanitarian operations. Within the humanitarian assistance framework, early recovery and resilience approaches have been increasingly used by interagency standing committee agencies - IASC (UN agencies, national and international NGOs) and these approaches have been mainstreamed across all sectors in the 2015 Humanitarian Response Plan for Sudan. A policy emphasis on transition from relief to development, where possible, has also been captured in the National Strategic Plan, the interim-PRSP, IDP policy, the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) and the Darfur Development Strategy (DDS), presented by the Government and endorsed by international partners in Doha in April 2013.

 

UNDP is the global cluster lead on Early Recovery and has two distinct roles on Early Recovery; 1) Early recovery programming and 2) Supporting the inter-agency coordination structures in the humanitarian response. In relation to the second role, in the first week of March, UNDP organised a number of Early Recovery events aiming to further integrate and strengthen Early Recovery in the humanitarian response in Sudan. The events were organised through the Return, Recovery and Reintegration (RRR) sector in Sudan, together with the sector’s Government counterpart, the Humanitarian Aid Commission (HAC), and the co-leads of the sector, IOM and CRS.

 

Key Documents

Final Report ER Workshop Sudan 2015

 

Click here to learn more on Early Recovery in Sudan.

The ongoing crisis in Ukraine has had a devastating humanitarian impact: 1.4 million people in Ukraine are in need of humanitarian assistance. A million people have been displaced (508,000 IDPs plus a similar number fleeing the country) with new displacement ongoing. Among IDPs are high numbers of children, elderly and persons with disabilities. In the East, damage to infrastructure, private enterprises and personal property has been significant, with severe repercussions for livelihoods and access to public services. Compounding the situation, a government decree in November closed all government offices in non-government-controlled areas and halted funding of pensions, hospitals, schools, social benefits, and other government services, including limiting access to cash and banking services. As the crisis becomes protracted, people’s resilience is under increasing strain. The influx of IDPs has put strains on community infrastructure in hosting communities. Social tensions are increasing.

 

The RC has requested activation of the cluster system for humanitarian response, including an Early Recovery and Livelihoods cluster, to be led by UNDP.  Formal activation of the cluster system by the ERC/IASC, though fully expected in coming weeks, is pending clarification between UNHCR and OHCHR as to leadership of the Protection Cluster. In anticipation, UN agencies are increasing their capacity (e.g. OCHA hiring 15 new staff, UNHCR increasing staff) and additional INGOs (eg. MercyCorps) are setting up operations in the country. The UN is increasing its field presence, with four UN field offices being set up in the East, some of which will be coordination hubs where OCHA anticipates sub-national clusters will be established. 

 

Key Documents

Cluster ER and UNDP Ukraine Workshop Dec 2014

 

Click here to learn more on Early Recovert in Ukraine.